Schools and Educational Visits

The future of remembrance lies with our youth and Lochnagar Crater is fully committed to ensure that pupils are made aware of the events that took place at La Boisselle and WW1.

On the School Project’s page schools can access lessons complete with resources – Power points, worksheets etc. that give an accurate account of the battle at La Boisselle. Pupils can also access the Virtual Cemetery to create a link to one of the unknown soldiers who died on this battlefield.  Another page entitled –  July 1st1916 – Attack on La Boisselle – video stories provides short commentaries outlining the battle and methods of attack.

Code of Behaviour – Take only photographs – leave only footprints
  • Please ensure that your group stay on the designated footpaths.
  • Visitors are not allowed to descend into the Crater for obvious reasons of safety and to stop erosion.
  • Please show respect for other groups/individuals that may be visiting at the same time.
  • It is important that students visiting the Crater are aware that young men fought, suffered and died at the Crater and in the surrounding fields and they should respect the area and its environs accordingly.
  • The Crater should be a place of quiet contemplation and reflection.
Length of visit
  • We would suggest a visit time of around 45 minutes for school groups. A school visit might look something like this.
  • Aim of visit – By the end of your visit you should have a clear understanding about the events that took place on this battlefield on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.
Whilst visiting Lochnagar Crater today we suggest you:
  • Learn about the battle that took place at La Boisselle on July 1st  1916 (the worst day ever in British military history). This was the worst battlefield.
  • Log on to the Virtual Cemetery and read the story of one of the Unknown soldiers who died at La Boisselle.
  • Read six panels from the Labyrinth – three connected to July 1st 1916, three about other aspects of the war.
  • Walk around the rim of the crater and read the points of reflection and take a moment to think about the information you have gained today.
  • Understand that the Crater was originally blown to kill; it now serves a different purpose. What is its new purpose?

We hope that this Web site will meet the needs of students and staff and we wish all schools a successful and enjoyable visit to the Lochnagar Crater.

Virtual Cemetery

The Unknown Soldier – Click on a Battalion Regiment to enter the Virtual Cemetery. Include Northumberland Fusiliers, Northumberland Fusiliers, Royal Scots, Suffolk / Cambridge and Lincolnshire

The Angela Speakman Prize

This prestigious prize is generously funded, organised and judged by Mike and Frances Speakman, both dedicated and knowledgeable visitors to the battlefields and have consistently been enthusiastic supporters of young people who visit Lochnagar.

School Projects

Specifically created for us by an experienced teacher and tour guide, a work-pack entitled ‘Adopt an Unknown Soldier is available for schools and colleges to utilise and enhance their learning experience.

July 1st 1916 – Attack on La Boisselle

Attack on La Boisselle, July 1st 1916 – Choose a soldier from the virtual cemetery and follow his story through the battle. On the worst day ever in British military history, La Boisselle was the worst battlefield.

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WW1 Centenary project

As part of the World War 1 Centenary (sponsored by The Heritage Lottery Fund) a project entitled ‘The Unknown soldier’ was created by Brendan Maitland for secondary schools. The aim was to link one pupil to one unknown soldier, for every unknown soldier that died at La Boisselle on July 1st 1916.